While South Korea plans to replace all textbooks with tablets by 2015, the U.S. has banned the use of mobile phones in schools

Webster strongly pointed out that there would be occupational and economic change in information society. In order to educate new generation to be able to survive in information society, educators shall incorporate information technology to connect/engage students into wired society and encourage students to embrace new culture and space in information superhighway.

The Use of Tablets, a mobile technology in Schools.

The Use of Tablets, as Mobile Technology in Schools.

This makes me think about two case studies about how educators react to mobile technology:

A) South Korea: How students use tablets instead of textbooks?
B) U.S.: Why mobile phones are banned in schools? 

While South Korea plans to replace all textbooks with tablets by 2015, the U.S. has banned the use of mobile phones in schools. I wonder we are overlook pitfall of technology, or they do not know about the third wave, information economic?

Mobile Phones Banned in Schools

Mobile Phones Banned in Schools in the U.S.

APPENDIX

Crawford, S. (1993). The origin and development of a concept: The information society. The Bulletin of the Medical Librarian Association, 71(4), 380-385

Quotes from Article

  • What is the concept of the information society?
  • Students and professors charged Machlup with having called the large university a “knowledge factory”
  • Machlup, Porat, and Bell argue that we shifted from an agricultural economy to an industrial economy during the nineteenth century. After World War II, they continue, we evolved into a service economy. Now, we have become an information economy.
  • Machlup’s concept of education is broad and bears little relationship to how the federal government measures educational expenditures; for example the cost of education in the home includes wages that parents would be earning if they worked instead of staying at home.
  • Machlup and Porat have regrouped the outputs of exiting industries and were able to form a new “information” category. Some of the outputs or activities are new, in the sense that they did not exist in previous years. But many of the outputs, such as education, entertainment, and the arts, have existed for a long time, and are regrouped into the new information sector. As Cooper summed it up.

Question

  1. Is there any potential subsets/categories that potentially have high growth rate in GNP in the new future, for example, lifestyle products like entertainment, health and beauty, fashion? If the answer is “Yes”, then we might be able to see another economy form following information technology. Isn’t it new? Or it still comes from 4 existing categories: agriculture, services, industry and government.

Webster, F. (2006). The information society revisited. In L. Lievrouw & S. Livingstone (Eds.), The Handbook of New Media, Updated Student Edition (443-457). London: Sage.

Quotes from Article

  • Most of the conceptions of an “information society” are of limited use to social scientists, and still less to the winder public’s understanding of transformation in the world today.
  • Definitions of an information society – 6 ways to distinguishing:
  1. Technological innovation and diffusion – the future is being born in the so-called Information Superhighways and anyone bypassed by these highways. This new ‘technoeconomic paradigm’ constitutes the ‘information age’ which is set to mature early in the new century.
  2. Occupational change – the decline of manufacturing employment and the rise of service sector employment is interpreted as the loss of manual jobs and its replacement with white-collar work. Since eth raw material of non-manual labor is information. A focus on occupational change is one, which stresses the transformative power of information itself rather than the influence of information technologies. 20% of the US workforce is constituted by this group, which manages, designs, creates, and refines information.
  3. Economy – half of US’s GNP accounted for by these combined informational sectors: information goods and services producers, and the public and private (secondary information sector) bureaucracies.
  4. Space – a ‘wired society’ operating at the national, international ring main to each home, shop, university and office – and even to the mobile individual who has his laptop and modem in his briefcase.
  5. Culture – this explosion of signification that many writers conceive of our having entered and information society, one where everything what we see and do is simulated.
  6. From quantity to quality – we could feel impelled to so designate is because of the decisive role of information/knowledge in the power structure and direction of social change. What we have here is the assumption that quantitative increases transform – in unspecified ways into qualitative change in the social system.
  • What does it mean technology? The lack of precision, and the habit of aggregating highly diverse conceptions into the single category, ought to encourage closer scrutiny of a blanket term that has been used rather promiscuously in recent years.
  • Theoretical knowledge. It is undeniably and arresting idea, one which prima facie defines a new type of society which hinges on the generation and use of information/knowledge. The rise of theoretical knowledge is to be chartered by the spread of educational certification – a common strategy – then this is to introduce still another significantly different definition. Such imprecision may lead one to e wary of theoretical knowledge as a sound means of distinguishing and information society, albeit that a decisive shift towards the primacy of theory does appear to be a marked feature of recent history.
  • It is ironic that the most persuasive conception of tan information society, that which centers on the role of theoretical knowledge, is the least commonly suggested by information society adherents.

Question

  1. Webster strongly pointed out that there would be occupational and economic change in information society. In order to educate new generation to be able to survive in information society, educators shall incorporate information technology to connect/engage students into wired society and encourage students to embrace new culture and space in information superhighway.  This makes me think about two case studies about how educators react to mobile technology: A) South Korea: How students use tablets instead of textbooks? B) U.S.: Why mobile phones are banned in schools? While South Korea plans to replace all textbooks with tablets by 2015, the U.S. has banned the use of mobile phones in schools. I wonder we are overlook pitfall of technology, or they do not know about the third wave, information economic?

Dyson, E., Gilder, G., Keyworth, G., & Toffler, A. (1996). Cyberspace and the American dream: A Magna Carta for the knowledge age (release 1.2, August 22, 1994). The Information Society, 12(3), 295-308

Quotes from Article

  • The industrial age is not fully over. In fact, classic Second Wave sectors have learned how to benefit from Third Wave technological break-through. Just as the First Wave’s agricultural productivity benefited exponentially from the Second Wave’s far-mechanization.
  • Patent law during the past two decades have broadened these protections to incorporate “electronic property”
  • A more sophisticated approach starts with recognizing how the Third Wave has fundamentally altered the nature of knowledge as a “good,” and that the operative effect is not technology per se.
  • In expensive knowledge destroys economies of scale. Customized knowledge permits “just-in-time” production for an ever-rising number of goods. Technological progress creates new means of serving old markets, turning one-time monopolies into competitive battlegrounds.
  • Static competition is good, because it forces costs and prices to the lowest levels possible for a given product. Dynamic competition is better, because it allows competing technologies and new products to challenges the old ones and, if they really are better, to replace them.
  • Cyberspace will play an important role knitting together in the diverse communities of tomorrow, facilitating the creation of “electronic neighborhoods” bound together not by geography but by shared interests.
  • When it becomes economically desirable to have more than one provider in a market? The continuation of regulation under these circumstances stops progress in its tracks. It prevents new entrants from introducing new technologies and new products, while depriving the regulated monopolist of any incentive to do so on its own. Price-and-entry regulation, in short,  is the antithesis of dynamic competition.
  • Financial Accounting Standards Board starts to reflect the shortened capital life-cycles of the Knowledge Age, and the increasing role of intangible captal as “wealth”

 Question

  1. What is just-in-time product? How can developers/creators get retainer fees as mentioned in the article? If the property would transform into electronic form, what will be changed in capital, and investment in the future? There must be big opportunity for new generation to start their businesses by their own. As educators, how can we help students gain benefits from those electronic properties?

Witte, J. (2004) The case for multimethod research: Large sample design and the study of life online. In P. Howard & S. Jones (Eds.), Society online: The Internet in context (xv-xxxiv). London: Sage.

Quotes from Article

  • Programming a Web-based survey can be costly, but this cost is fixed. While the traditional methods might require more sampling sizes or additional budget later.
  • A Web-based survey potentially reduces interviewer effects and permits a degree of anonymity not found in survey.
  • 2000 GSS: coverage restrictions excluded a small but practically wired segment of the population.
  • Survey2011, as a Web-based survey of online life, was better positioned to capture a large sample of individuals who were particularly plugged into life online.
  • Telephone surveys, with their own patterns of nonresponse and selection, may give an inaccurate picture of Web users. The virtues of multimethod studies may extend to covering the blind spots of telephone surveys as well as those of Web surveys.

Question

  1. Many studies indicate that Asians do not feel free to share their ideas in front of other. As a result, Web-based surveys potentially encourage people to share their opinion freely, especially if they are under anonymous conditions. My question here is: How could teachers explore this implication into Asian classrooms in order to encourage Asian students to share their opinions more?
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About bankcolumbia

Graduate Student . M.A. Instructional Technology and Media . Teachers College . Columbia University . ac3344@columbia.edu View all posts by bankcolumbia

3 responses to “While South Korea plans to replace all textbooks with tablets by 2015, the U.S. has banned the use of mobile phones in schools

  • Keith Kaplan

    I totally read/heard about this news about South Korea this summer. I work in the textbook industry and i remember South Korea announcing they are trying to digitize all of their schooling material by 2015. I think this is definitely one of the countries that is trying to be an early adopter. There is research that shows, currently more students would rather have a paper textbook as opposed to digital/tablet textbooks. It’s a different type of experience. I for one am not interested in having a textbooks on a tablet, articles/pdf’s on the other hand I am for. What do u think?

    • bankcolumbia

      Me too. I am not a fan of reading books by using tablets. I get used to read and write on the paper. Nevertheless, I need to accept the fact that I was born in paper and pencil era, while those kids are not. They, in fact, were born in digital era. They play their parents’ iPhones and tablets since they are young. I believe the policy of replacing all textbooks with tablets in South Korea would be a flagship for educational change with technology. Thailand is one of the country which is about to use tablets for every 1st graders in 2013.

      • marialarahwang

        Keith and Bank,

        you guys really bring up some good points. Here is a question then. Being in school and having taught in school I know that at least in the U.S. text books are barely used in the math and science classes, for example. English is a little different because you all need to have a novel to read it and write papers on and what not. So knowing that text books are not used very frequently and are SUPER heavy and students do not even carry them home to study for exams, etc. why would it not be a good idea to move over to the tablet and use the content of the text book at ease and when needed?

        Growing up in South Korea as well I know it would be a different story. Books are MUCH lighter in Korea and we use every single text book in every subject we learn. That is also why it is mandatory for the students to purchase all the books every year and also they cost like 50 cents per book. We extensively take notes, highlight, and underline everything in our textbooks and I cannot even imagine ALL students doing the same amount of work on a tablet. So interested to see how this really gets implemented… 🙂

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